Long before social media, there were photojournalists whose work was shared across traditional media channels. The right instincts, in the right moment, resulted in an image that captured the imagination, documented an event and told a story. A single image seen across all media channels. In today’s more media savvy environment, we might say it went viral. A single moment, a single image and a single opportunity to capture that image. Guts, instinct, talent, intuition, anticipation and a passion for the story; these are a few of the key ingredients for a successful photojournalist.

In 1991 my friend and great talent Ira Yoffe, then VP Creative Director at Parade Magazine, invited me to participate in the Eddie Adams Workshop. In 2017 The Eddie Adams Workshop celebrated 30 years of its unique program for photojournalists. This is an intense, four-day gathering of top photography professionals, along with 100 carefully selected students. The workshop is tuition-free, and the students are chosen based on the merit of their portfolios. Nikon has been the workshop’s major sponsor since its inception. I’ve been shooting with Nikon Cameras and lenses most of my life. There is an extraordinary relationship between Nikon and The Eddie Adams Workshop, so I try to support Nikon when I can. I still use many of my original Nikon manual focus lenses for both still and video work, even on other cameras. It’s time-proven quality and in the moment, reliability is key.

During the workshop, I was part of the guest faculty sharing my experience and perspective with these young photojournalists. Also on the faculty was the great Duane Michals, among many other celebrated and talented creatives and editors. I don’t recall exactly what Duane Michals had to say to them, but one can imagine it included trusting their creative instincts. My message to these young professionals was simple. For the rest of their lives they would have two jobs; making the work and promoting the work.

It is the same for brands; make the brand and promote the brand. Photojournalists make great hires to help execute social media campaigns. Social media is a ready-made channel for photojournalists. When aligned to your brand story and the goals you would like to achieve, the skills of a photojournalist are hard to beat. One result: the work will come from a more authentic, investigative place as opposed to some very prescribed idea of your brand. Social media immediacy and authenticity is lost when content becomes an entirely mechanical unfolding of the campaign. To me, social media is most successful when it balances the organic with the highly orchestrated.

When considering how to hire for successful social media, think outside the traditional agency box.

Blockchain could save the media environment for brands. There has been a fair amount written about how blockchain might result in greater transparency in media buying and tracking; if it all works as conceived, it will also be a boon for content creators enabling direct engagement with audiences and direct payment too. This advancement has the potential to put more leverage back on the side of creators like musicians, film makers, photographers, writers and journalists too.

Blockchain has potential to greatly minimize the prevalence of fake news and level set social media networks too. This is particularly important for brands. In the world of robotic ad buys, ads can end up being dropped into the most unsavory of contexts. As a brand manager, if my banner ads were popping up in the social media feeds of people who do not share the same values of the brand, I would be very concerned. How can a brand live its truth when its lived experience is often in direct contrast to the social responsibility ethos it seeks to express? As the old adage goes, “you are the company you keep.”

As an example, racists buy cars, houses and cappuccinos. They have jobs, pay taxes and in general, contribute to society; but some of the values they keep are values most brands would never support.

For legacy media outlets with legitimate journalistic integrity like the NY Times, fake news is rarely, if ever, an issue. Ads served in this context are elevated by the integrity of the enterprise.

For lesser media properties and the robotic ad placements that serve them, brands can end up in context of uncorroborated reporting, fabricated events and misinformation. Corroborated reporting is a hallmark of journalistic integrity. Fake news even fakes corroboration.

Blockchain has the potential to minimize this activity forcing down onto this media a governance of integrity through the use of corroboration across a blockchain ecosystem that would fact check content and give brand managers and media buyers leverage, insight and security in knowing that their brand is not being used to legitimize fake news and in turn be diminished by its participation in the fakery.

This would reward journalistic integrity with greater ad placement and minimize placement in fake news and hopefully, choke-off its source of income. The bigger issue though, is a societal issue; we have a culture that seems to not care if news is fake. As advertisers, we have an obligation to uphold the integrity of the media, without it we risk casting brand reputation to the dogs.